Parenting

When can my child decide who to live with?

This is one of the most common questions that family lawyers are asked by parents who are separated.

The Family Law Act 1975 and case law does not define the age for when children can decide who they live with. Generally, Courts are more likely to give greater weight to adolescent children’s views and wishes, in light of their developmental maturity in comparison to younger children. However, all family law matters are determined on a case-by-case basis and even the views of teenagers are not determinative.

Obtaining an Australian passport for your child without the other parent’s consent

Your bags are packed, the cruise is booked, but you realise that the passport you hold for your child has expired. Or you find that they never had one to begin with. In Australia there are three ways in which a passport can be obtained for a child.

Parenting arrangements after separation

After separation most parents are able to reach agreement about arrangements for their children, but for some it takes longer than others. Unless there are Court orders in place, both parents continue to have parental responsibility for their children after separation. This means that there is an obligation on both parents to consult with one another and to attempt to reach agreement about arrangements for their children.

What do I do next?

When a marriage or a de facto relationship ends, there are a lot of emotions being felt by both parties and those around them. There can be feelings of guilt, relief, anger and despair. These are all a very important part of the grieving and recovery process. As well as dealing with these emotions there are often questions about when issues of care arrangements for children, property settlement or divorce can be dealt with.